Fishing Boats For Sale

In this guide about used fishing boats we are going to jump right to the good stuff. We won’t be discussing little 12-foot aluminum boats with a 10-horse Johnson outboard on them, though boats like that certainly have their place in the fishing world. They are perfect for small inland lakes under 100 acres…sorry, we said we weren’t going there.

When you love to fish you realize that sometimes not one boat fits all the types of angling you want to do. In this guide we’ll suggest tips for finding the right used fishing boats for use on large lakes and calm ocean flats.


Alumacraft
Fishing Boats

Aluminum
Fishing Boats

Bass
Fishing Boats

Freshwater
Fishing Boats

Inshore Saltwater
Fishing Boats

Offshore Saltwater
Fishing Boats

The first tip is to know how many you want in the boat. This will determine the size of the used fishing boats you should be considering. If you love to fish solo, and who doesn’t at times, when you just need to get away, then a smaller bass boat will suffice. Most are outfitted for 2, with a deck in front and one in back. Sizes range from tidy 14 footers to about 18 feet. Aluminum hulled boats are most commonly found on the used fishing boats market and they are consistently more affordable. They also happen to be more durable, though a bit heavier, their only drawback over fiberglass. If you’ve got a couple of kids then you might want to look at a boat of at least 16 feet, though 20 feet might make more sense. If three fishermen are slinging crank baits each sporting a pair of sharp treble hooks then you want everyone to have a little room!

The second primary consideration involves the towing capacity of your current vehicle, presuming you do not plan to upgrade it immediately. This will determine the upper limits of the used fishing boats you consider. Before you shop for used fishing boats know your weight limit and then take into consideration the weight of the boat, the boat trailer, the boat motor and a full tank of gas.

The third consideration when perusing used fishing boats is whether to opt for aluminum or fiberglass. In short, aluminum is heavier and rides a bit rougher through white caps. On the upside, aluminum offers incredible durability. Run it into the rocks by accident and a scratch or two might result. Do that with fiberglass and you may have problems. And as noted, aluminum boats are typically offered at lower prices. Fiberglass produces a quieter ride and glides through the water with less resistance, a factor to consider if you plan on running anything larger than a 50-horse engine. Fiberglass boats are usually better, too, for dual purposes like pulling a water skier or tube rider.

If you know what you want to do with your boat, what your budget is, and your vehicle’s towing ability then you are much more likely to find used fishing boats that will meet your needs and deliver years of relaxation and pleasure.